Johannes Bronckhorst ( 1648 - 1726 )

A set of eight European bird paintings


A set of eight European bird paintings


Provenance:
England since the 18th century
Formally in the Gerard Leigh collection at Luton Hoo, Bedfordshire

Crossbill
bodycolour on card
8 ½ x 10 ½ cm. (21.5 x 26.5 cm.)
signed and dated I.c JB f ad viv: 1724

Large Red Finch
bodycolour on card
8 ½ x 10 ½ cm. (21.5 x 26.5 cm.)
signed I.r. JB fecit

Nightingale
bodycolour on card
8 ½ x 10 ½ cm. (21.5 x 26.5 cm.)
signed

Pipit
bodycolour on card
8 ½ x 10 ½ cm. (21.5 x 26.5 cm.)
signed and inscribed JB f ad viv

Lesser Spotted Woodpecker
bodycolour on card
8 ½ x 10 ½ cm. (21.5 x 26.5 cm.)
signed and inscribed JB ad. viv, lower centre

Common Turn
bodycolour on card
8 ½ x 10 ½ cm. (21.5 x 26.5 cm.)
signed

Ring Ouzel
bodycolour on card
8 ½ x 10 ½ cm.
(21.5 x 26.5 cm.)
signed and dated JB f. ad viv 1725

Sparrowhawk
bodycolour on card
8 ½ x 10 ½ cm. (21.5 x 26.5 cm.)
signed and inscribed JB f ad viv


This remarkable group of bird paintings were completed about three hundred years ago, and still have their eighteenth-century frames. Little is known about Bronckhorst’s actual life, but his work is familiar to us through many similar depictions of birds and insects. These are painted in gouache – or bodycolour – and are in excellent condition, retaining much of their original colour. That these birds are recognizable to us today is explained perhaps by the inscription ‘ad vivum’ to be found on several of the group, suggesting that the artist was able to study them at first hand.

Detail Description:

This remarkable group of bird paintings were completed about three hundred years ago, and still have their eighteenth-century frames. Little is known about Bronckhorst’s actual life, but his work is familiar to us through many similar depictions of birds and insects. These are painted in gouache – or bodycolour – and are in excellent condition, retaining much of their original colour. That these birds are recognizable to us today is explained perhaps by the inscription ‘ad vivum’ to be found on several of the group, suggesting that the artist was able to study them at first hand.

Johannes Bronckhorst